Search

Volunteers urge folk to enjoy hidden gem

PUBLISHED: 09:18 30 January 2008 | UPDATED: 10:45 08 July 2010

It is one of the hidden gems of Thetford Forest.

But a collection of 200 different varieties of trees in Norfolk is set to welcome more visitors and scientists following work by a dedicated team of volunteers.

It is one of the hidden gems of Thetford Forest.

But a collection of 200 different varieties of trees in Norfolk is set to welcome more visitors and scientists following work by a dedicated team of volunteers.

Lynford Arboretum was formed more than 60 years ago when the neighbouring Lynford Hall was a school for trainee foresters.

But the 40-acre site, which is popular with the bird watching community, is set to become more of a tourist attraction as part of plans by the Friends of Thetford Forest Park.

The volunteer body, which took over the gardening, management, and planting responsibilities from the Forestry Commission nearly a year ago, is set to get a new education centre and storage area in place by the Easter and hopes to install interpretation boards around the arboretum in the future.

It comes as the collection of rare conifers from across Europe, Asia, North and South America, is set to play an important research role over the next few years.

Mike Hume, from the Friends of Thetford Forest Park, said other scientifically important species will be planted at Forestry Commission's most easterly and driest of its nine arboretum sites to help officials understand the impact of climate change on trees and shrubs.

“It is one of the smallest arboretums, but from a European and international perspective, Lynford will play a small but not insignificant part in the overall picture,” he said.

Mr Hume added that the creation of the nearby Lynford Water over the last year from a former quarry site, will add to the arboretum's popularity.

“Thetford Forest has an awful lot of little gems and most people only know about High Lodge and the large stops along the road from Thetford to Mundford.

“Lynford Arboretum is one of those little pearls, but it must not just become a place for academics, the public have to enjoy them and get to know them. It is a peaceful and tranquil place, but the potential for the future is massive,” he said.

For more information, visit www.fotfp.org.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Watton and Swaffham Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists