Five rare birds that have been spotted in Norfolk

A rare white-tailed eagle has been seen over Norfolk Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto/Neil_Burt

A rare white-tailed eagle has been seen over Norfolk Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto/Neil_Burton - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

When it comes to spotting a Rufous Bush Chat or a White Blackbird, you could do a lot worse than visiting Norfolk and Waveney.

The county has seen an array of rare birds flocking to its shores over the past year, with some even prompting a warning from the police.

Here are five birds that have been spotted in the county, and where they were seen:

Rufous Bush Chat

A Rufous Bush Chat bird spotted in Stiffkey, Norfolk Picture: Simon King/Twitter @UKTwitcher

A Rufous Bush Chat bird spotted in Stiffkey, Norfolk Picture: Simon King/Twitter @UKTwitcher - Credit: Archant

This small bird caused quite a commotion when it appeared at Stiffkey Marshes near Wells in October last year, with more than 100 bird watchers racing to the area.

The bird received so much attention that police were forced to warn the public that travelling to see it would breach Coronavirus regulations in place at the time.

It was believed to be the first time the Robin species had been spotted in Britain since the 1990s, but bird experts said realistically it was the first opportunity to see one in the UK since the 1960s."

White Blackbird

An albino blackbird spotted in Horsham St Faith. Picture: Natasha Covell

An albino blackbird spotted in Horsham St Faith in May 2020. - Credit: Natasha Covell

This unusual bird was spotted perched on a drainpipe at St Edmund's Church on Fishergate in Norwich by a mother of five who was out for a walk with her children during February this year.

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It gets its white colour because of a condition called partial albinism, it is usually inherited but can be caused by other factors. 

Bird experts confirmed the bird was unusual to see but said it was not extremely rare.

White-Tailed Sea Eagle

eagle

A new bid is being launched to reintroduce the white-tailed se eagle to Norfolk - Credit: Ainsley Bennett

This bird has been spotted a number of times recently as it swoops over the Norfolk coast.

It was originally thought to be extinct 240 years ago, however in November last year it was spotted over Lakenheath, Cley and parts of Cambridgeshire.

Hoopoe

A hoopoe photographed in Wells, North Norfolk by Brad Damms. Picture: Brad Damms

A hoopoe photographed in Wells, North Norfolk by Brad Damms. Picture: Brad Damms - Credit: Archant

This exotic-looking creature, which is about the size of a mistle thrush, can turn up, often as single birds, when overshooting while migrating north to Europe from Africa.

It was spotted in August last year when a family were driving through the village of Wighton, between Fakenham and Wells.

This bird is a very rare site as it does not breed in the UK, although sightings have increased in the county recently.

Black-Browed Albatross

It was a dream come true for one bird watcher when they spotted the rare albatross in Lowestoft two miles out to sea in September last year.

While this species is one of the more common types of albatross, it is classed as endangered – not least as they are one of the most frequently killed species in many longline fisheries.

One of the largest flying birds, they breed in the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and Chile with small numbers on sub-Antarctic islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

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