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Coronavirus: Norfolk special constables give 1,000 hours in a week

PUBLISHED: 13:55 07 April 2020 | UPDATED: 13:55 07 April 2020

Norfolk Special Constables take part in an intensive training event where they get to be assessed on their responses to different events like domestic abuse, traffic violations and public disturbances.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2017

Norfolk Special Constables take part in an intensive training event where they get to be assessed on their responses to different events like domestic abuse, traffic violations and public disturbances. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2017

ARCHANT EASTERN DAILY PRESS (01603) 772434

Special constables in Norfolk have given more than 1,000 hours of their time over the past week to help support communities across the county in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.

Special Chief Officer Darren Taylor. Photo:Sonya Duncan.Special Chief Officer Darren Taylor. Photo:Sonya Duncan.

A total of 65 special constables contributed 134 shifts and 1005 hours of deployment between March 29 to April 5 as part of the Norfolk force’s effort to protect communities and manage the demands of Covid-19.

Additional Special Constables have also volunteered their time carrying out essential roles from police stations across Norfolk, including supporting vulnerable people during the outbreak.

Special Chief Officer Darren Taylor said: “Our officers are well trained, developed and supported as an integral element of the Norfolk Police family. They are unpaid volunteers who are passionate about serving their communities, and I’ve been humbled by their response to the current situation. I’d like to extend my personal gratitude to each and every one of my team who has stepped forward to support and protect the NHS and save lives.

“Volunteering in any capacity requires a balance of family and work life, and none more so than now. Many of our specials constables are in full time employment and like many other people are affected by furlough or reduced hours. It’s testament to their commitment that they are using this additional time for the benefit of others.

Norfolk Police's assistant chief constable for Norfolk Constabulary, Julie Wvendth. Photo: Norfolk ConstabularyNorfolk Police's assistant chief constable for Norfolk Constabulary, Julie Wvendth. Photo: Norfolk Constabulary

“I am also extremely grateful to a number of local employers who have allowed our officers flexibility, and in some cases paid leave, to enable them to provide a front-line role in policing. It will take a combined effort of all of us across the community, helping neighbours, caring for the vulnerable in any capacity to allow the key workers to focus on the priorities over the coming period.”

In the past week special constables have been working alongside their regular colleagues responding to ongoing incidents, as well as engaging, explaining, encouraging and enforcing the government’s measures restricting people’s movements.

Temporary Assistant Chief Constable Julie Wvendth said: “We’re very fortunate in Norfolk that so many talented and dedicated people who, without hesitation, have put themselves forward to help and support their communities and the county.”


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