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Heatwave latest: How hot will it be across Norfolk?

PUBLISHED: 14:11 23 July 2019

East Anglia is set for a scorching heatwave over the next few days, weather forecasters have said. People enjoying the hot weather at Lowestoft beach. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

East Anglia is set for a scorching heatwave over the next few days, weather forecasters have said. People enjoying the hot weather at Lowestoft beach. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

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Norfolk is set to sizzle in the sunshine with forecasters predicting a "hot, humid and tropical" few days as a heatwave makes it way to the region.

Temperatures are set to reach the mid thirties as a mass of hot and humid air from southern Europe arrives on our shores.

And Norwich-based forecasters Weatherquest have said the mercury could hit up to 33C to 34C, with the hottest day of the week falling on Thursday.

Forecaster Adam Dury said: "It's going to stay dry throughout the day today (Tuesday, July 23).

"Temperatures are already 27C and could easily reach 30-32C across the region.

"It's looking fairly dry at night with a small chance of a thunderstorm at around midnight."

And the region is in for a hot night, as he added: "Temperatures won't really drop below 19C tonight."

The weather is expected to remain scorching over the next few days, with temperatures in the low thirties tomorrow (Wednesday, July 24), and lows of 19C to 20C overnight.

"It needs to reach above 38.5C to be the hottest temperature ever recorded in the UK," Mr Dury added.

"It's a fairly low risk at the moment - our region could probably get up to 33C to 34C and it looks like Essex and Kent could easily see 35C to 36C.

"So we're more likely to beat the July record temperature for the UK, which is 36.7C."

A heatwave is declared once temperatures are above 27C for three days.

"You've got a warm air mass coming up from Spain and the Mediterranean," Mr Dury added.

"The heatwave is caused by all that warm, humid, tropical air coming up to us

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"That air mass is really hot and humid, and it looks to be Saturday before temperatures will be back in the low twenties.

"There will be highs of 22C to 23C but it will be more bearable."

And those craving fresher conditions are set to be disappointed, as the forecaster confirmed we could still be basking in warm weather until next week.

Norfolk Police have also warned people to enjoy the hot weather safely and urged those looking to cool off to avoid swimming in lakes or rivers.

Chief inspector and community safety officer Craig Miller said: "It is difficult to judge how deep the water is and there can also be obstructions underneath the surface where people could become trapped.

"We urge people not to go into rivers, lakes and open water and ask parents to make sure their youngsters know about the dangers and go to the local swimming pool, where they can have fun and be safe."

Officers also reminded the public to be aware of home security as thieves will be on the look-out for personal property left within reach of open windows and unlocked doors.

Common mistakes are leaving handbags and car keys close to unlocked front or back doors, or leaving jewellery and electronic items on display near an open window.

To deter walk-in thieves, householders are advised to:

- Keep doors and windows shut and locked where possible, especially if the room or home is unoccupied;

- Lock doors if you are spending time outside and out of view of your home;

- When answering your door, make sure other external doors are locked first;

- And to keep valuables and personal property out of sight, away from window sills, worktops and tables.

Also vulnerable at this time of year are cars left for long periods of time at coastal car parks and beauty spots.

Motorists are advised to remove all valuables from display and from the vehicle where possible.

Are you enjoying the hot weather in Norfolk? Send us your pictures on Facebook at EDP24 or Twitter @EDP24.

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