Search

Donations roll in for horse charities

PUBLISHED: 14:38 29 January 2008 | UPDATED: 10:45 08 July 2010

They were images that shocked the nation and the most experienced of animal welfare workers.

But faith in human nature was restored for two Norfolk equine charities at the weekend as a convoy of donations rolled into the county following a major rescue operation.

They were images that shocked the nation and the most experienced of animal welfare workers.

But faith in human nature was restored for two Norfolk equine charities at the weekend as a convoy of donations rolled into the county following a major rescue operation.

More than two weeks after 90 horses, ponies and donkeys were recovered from squalid conditions from a farm in Amersham, Buckinghamshire - nine lorry loads of food, blankets, bedding and tack were delivered on Saturday to two of the centres that helped give them a chance of a new life.

Officials from the International League for the Protection of Horses (ILPH) and Redwings said they were “overwhelmed” by the generosity of the British public following the horrific neglect case in which more than 30 animals were found dead or had to be put down.

The ILPH's Hall Farm rescue and rehabilitation centre at Snetterton, which is currently caring for 11 horses from the Amersham farm, cleared a whole barn to accommodate the mountain of donations that came from Operation Esther.

The Redwings Horse Sanctuary at Hapton, near Long Stratton, which took in 13 horses and nine donkeys from the rescue on January 9, received five lorry loads of food and equipment from the appeal set up by members of the Horse and Hound online forum.

A total of 30 lorries left Newmarket on Saturday morning to deliver an estimated half a million pounds worth of goods to horse rehoming centres across the country.

Julie Magnus, who coordinated the massive operation, said she was “surprised” by the public response to the animal rescue.

“Everyone was shocked by the scale of the Amersham case and the number of horses involved was unprecedented. We have been absolutely overwhelmed. The phone has not stopped ringing and we are still getting a thousand e-mails a day. The UK people have united in one goal and shown that they care on a massive scale,” she said.

Dozens of volunteers came out in force at the weekend to help sort and clean the mountain of donations, which will either be used by the charities or sold on to boost income.

Tina Sales, head of fundraising at the ILPH said the efforts of the Operation Esther crew had been “absolutely fantastic”.

“Donations are hard to come by this time of year, so this is our lifeblood,” she said.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Watton and Swaffham Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists