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PUBLISHED: 17:11 15 April 2009 | UPDATED: 11:15 08 July 2010

A SWAFFHAM aerospace company is soaring above the woes of the recession and has clinched three major new contracts.

Swaffham based STG Aerospace's SafTGlo system is going from strength to strength.

A SWAFFHAM aerospace company is soaring above the woes of the recession and has clinched three major new contracts.

Swaffham based STG Aerospace's SafTGlo system is going from strength to strength.

Having already been fitted in more than 5,000 planes, one-third of the world's operating commercial aircraft, that number looks set to rise substantially thanks to deals with the Goodrich Corporation and Kenya Airways.

The company's other product, WEPPS (Wireless Emergency Primary Power System), is also seeing steady sales and STG has now teamed up with Fokker Services to offer the product to another 85 aircraft operators.

Kenya Airways is to be the first operator to install SafTGlo, a power free photoluminescent (PL) floor strip emergency lighting system designed to guide passengers to safety in the event of an aircraft emergency, on a Boeing 777.

As part of a larger deal the airline will also retro-fit their existing 737s and 767s.

And in a separate deal with the Goodrich Corporation STG's SafTGlo is set to further increase its market dominance.

Goodrich, which supplies systems and services to the aerospace industry across the globe, will now supply STG's photoluminescent (PL) system to all new customers who require it.

Peter Stokes, chief executive of STG, said: “Our PL floor path marking system can reduce costs by thousands of dollars on each aircraft on which it is installed.

“Safety systems are crucial but don't have to be expensive - essential at times when all operators are trying to keep costs low.

“As a supplier of PL to Goodrich, these savings will be easily available to many more operators.”

STG's second commercial success, WEPPS, is also increasing its market reach.

The system, also offers big savings to airlines by cutting down on turnaround and maintenance costs of aircraft emergency power system which operate things like overhead lights.

The system uses a special lithium sulphur dioxide battery, which is able to lie dormant almost indefinitely, and a small low frequency radio transmitter, which enables engineers to tell if the system is operating correctly at the touch of a button.

STG has now teamed up with Fokker Services to develop WEPPS for Fokker 50, 70 and 100 aircraft.

The deal means another 85 operators with nearly 450 aircraft will have access to the cost-saving technology.

Mr Stokes continued: “By developing a system suited to Fokker aircraft we are making the technology and the savings available to yet more customers.”

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